Tuesday, December 02, 2008

childhood obesity, smoking & sexual activity linked to media exposure

childhood obesity, smoking & sexual activity linked to media exposurefrom eco child's play: Common Sense Media published the report, Media and Child and Adolescent Health: A Systematic Review, which reviewed 173 of the best studies from the last 30 years which examine the connection between media exposure and negative health effects on children. The average modern child spends nearly 45 hours a week with television, movies, magazines, music, the Internet, cellphones and video games, the study reported. By comparison, children spend 17 hours a week with their parents on average and 30 hours a week in school, the study said... Download the Executive Summary of the report (2.2mb PDF) and read it for yourself, then start a “media diet” for your family.

1 comment:

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